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Article, Resource filed under Energy, Energy Self-Reliant States | Written by John Farrell | No Comments | Updated on Jul 26, 2011

Solar in Minnesota: Great Promise

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://www.ilsr.org/solar-minnesota-great-promise/

Back in April 2011, ILSR Senior Researcher John Farrell gave this presentation on the potential for solar power in Minnesota to a group of solar businesses and advocates. Solar in Minnesota: Great Potential View more presentations from John Farrell. Continue reading

Article filed under Energy, Energy Self-Reliant States | Written by John Farrell | No Comments | Updated on Jul 25, 2011

CapX2020 project working through environmental impacts

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://www.ilsr.org/capx2020-project-working-through-environmental-impacts/

CENTERVILLE, Wis. — About 75 residents from area communities affected by the CapX2020 power line project gathered at two public meetings Wednesday at the Centerville community center. Continue reading

Article filed under Energy, Energy Self-Reliant States | Written by John Farrell | No Comments | Updated on Jul 25, 2011

Lost in Transmission

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://www.ilsr.org/lost-transmission/

Update 7/26: One commenter asserts that the loss figures offered by the original author may be relevant in India, but do not reflect the U.S. grid, where losses total around 7%.  EIA data seems to reflect this [xls].

Can transmission losses completely offset economies of scale for solar power plants?  An article in Renewable Energy World argues against the building of multi-megawatt (MW) solar PV instead of on-site or local PV systems.  In particular, the author writes:

The biggest problem with the multi-MW solar PV plant is that it loses 12-15 percent of expensive power as it passes through a series of power transformers. PV solar inverters generate power at 400 [Volts] three-phase. In large plants, this power is first boosted to 66 [kilovolts] or more with several power transformers and then stepped down to 400V with another string of transformers to suit consumer requirements. In addition, there is a further transmission loss of 5-7 percent in the power grid. Why suffer an avoidable 20 percent loss of expensive solar power?

…There is thus no ‘scale advantage’ in large PV solar plants. In reality, all multi-MW plants are basically clusters of several 500-kW plants since solar inverter capacities are limited to about 500 kW and no more. Why not have one hundred 500 kW plants instead of one giant 50 MW plant?

With 20% of the power from a large-scale solar plant lost in transformers and power lines, it could seriously alter our previous analysis of solar economies of scale.  Here are the original charts, with the first chart shows our original analysis of solar economies of scale, with strong savings for scale for new projects (as reported by the Clean Coalition):

The next chart shows the economies of scale in the German rooftop PV market, as reflected in their feed-in tariff rates.  The percentages show the price in each size tranche relative to the price for the smallest rooftop PV systems.  Once again, there are significant savings for scale, especially when going from a project 100-1000 kW to one that is 1 megawatt or larger (15 percent).

But if there is a 20% power loss for the voltage stepping and transmission for larger solar projects, then when it comes to delivered power, small projects may perform better.  Let’s assume that projects 1 MW and larger require the voltage step and transmission (and incur the losses), whereas smaller plants do not.  The following two charts illustrate the difference.

The first chart takes the Clean Coalition (green line) data from the Solar PV Economies of Scale chart and calculates the levelized cost of the power from each size power plant based on the sunshine in southern California.  For the largest size solar power plants, the cost is adjusted for the losses due to transmission and transformer stepping.

As we can see in the first chart, the losses from transmission wipe out most economies of scale for large-scale solar, making 1 MW and larger solar PV plants equivalent to on-site solar power from a 25 kW solar PV array.

We can similarly examine the effect in the German case.  Here the government sets the price paid for solar by size class, and since it’s based on output at the power plant, large-scale plants that have transmission losses get paid for their entire power output, regardless of how much usable power reaches customers.  The following chart shows what German customers effectively pay for solar, assuming that 1 MW and larger facilities all experience the 20% transmission losses explained earlier.

 

As we can see in the chart, the cost of transmission can wipe out the economies of scale in installed costs, making large-scale solar comparable to solar PV of 30-100 kW, but without the same transformer and transmission losses. 

It may be true that the installed costs of solar PV continue to fall as projects get larger, but it’s clear that relying on the price of solar at the power plant does not accurately reflect the cost to the grid or ratepayers. For some size of larger power plants (1 MW? 5 MW?), the lost power from stepping up and down voltage through transformers and from transmission may largely offset the economies of scale from building a larger power plant.

Rather, mid-sized solar (or specifically, projects that can connect directly into the distribution system without changing the voltage) may deliver the best cost per kilowatt-hour.

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Article filed under Independent Business | Written by Stacy Mitchell | 6 Comments | Updated on Jul 22, 2011

Why is Michelle Obama’s food initiative promoting Walmart?

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://www.ilsr.org/why-michelle-obama-s-food-initiative-promoting-walmart/

I winced yesterday when James Gavin, chair of the Partnership for a Healthier America, said he’d like to see Walmart double its U.S. store count. He was speaking at Michelle Obama’s event announcing that several retailers will open stores in “food deserts.” It was a sort of half-jokey remark, but, still, in a conversation about food in America, the suggestion that Walmart should have an even bigger role in our food system is pretty disturbing. This is a company that already captures 25 percent of grocery sales nationally and more than 50 percent in some metro areas. Continue reading

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Article filed under Energy, Energy Self-Reliant States | Written by John Farrell | No Comments | Updated on Jul 21, 2011

Could California Save 30% or More on Solar With German Policy?

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://www.ilsr.org/could-california-save-30-or-more-solar-german-policy/

The Golden State has covered over 50,000 roofs with solar PV in the past decade, but could it also save 30% or more on its current solar costs?  It turns out switching energy policies could save ratepayers billions.

If 2011 is a banner year and the state sees 1 gigawatt (GW) of installed capacity, the savings to ratepayers of a CLEAN program (over 20 years) would be nearly $3 billion.

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Article filed under Energy, Energy Self-Reliant States | Written by John Farrell | No Comments | Updated on Jul 21, 2011

Overcoming the Roadblocks: Democratizing the Electricity System

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://www.ilsr.org/overcoming-roadblocks-democratizing-electricity-system/

A serialized version of our new report, Democratizing the Electricity System, Part 5 of 5. Click here for: Part 1 (The Electric System: Inflection Point) Part 2 (The Economics of Distributed Generation) Part 3 (The Political and Technical Advantages of Distributed Generation) Part 4 (Regulatory Roadblocks to Democratizing the Electricity System) Download the report. The… Continue reading

Article filed under Energy, Energy Self-Reliant States | Written by John Farrell | No Comments | Updated on Jul 20, 2011

German Rooftop Solar PV Beats U.S. Utility Scale Solar

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://www.ilsr.org/german-rooftop-solar-pv-beats-us-utility-scale-solar/

Energy policy matters, a lot.  The Germans have a comprehensive feed-in tariff, providing CLEAN contracts to anyone who wants to go solar (or wind, or biogas, etc).  The U.S. has a hodge-podge of utility, state and federal tax-based incentives.  What does that mean? 

Much cheaper German solar. In fact, it’s like having your favorite craft or microbrew beer at a price that beats Budweiser.  From a study of U.S. solar prices reported in Renewables International:

Perhaps most surprisingly, the study found that the planned arrays larger than one megawatt have an average installed price of $4.50 per watt, with only a third of the systems in the pipeline coming in at prices below four dollars per watt. As Renewables International reported in January, the installed system price of photovoltaics in the US was easily 60 percent above the level in Germany in 2010 for equivalent system sizes (arrays smaller than 100 kilowatts).

Here’s a chart illustrating that cost differential, with the German prices updated for the 2nd quarter of 2011.

If the German solar prices are wunderbar, that makes the U.S. “furchtbar.”

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Article filed under Energy, Energy Self-Reliant States | Written by John Farrell | No Comments | Updated on Jul 19, 2011

Breaking Grid Barriers Could Unleash Local Power and Clean Energy Jobs

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://www.ilsr.org/breaking-grid-barriers-could-unleash-local-power-and-clean-energy-jobs/

A recently released solar map of New York City found enough room for solar panels on building rooftops to power half the city during hours of peak electricity use.  And the city is not alone.  Almost 60 million Americans live in areas where solar prices are competitive with retail electricity costs, and this kind of… Continue reading

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Article, ILSR Press Room, Resource filed under Energy, Energy Self-Reliant States | Written by admin | No Comments | Updated on Jul 18, 2011

The Benefits of Clean, Local Energy

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://www.ilsr.org/john-farrell-talks-local-clean-energy-crowd-boulder-colorado/

Senior Researcher John Farrell presented on the benefits of local clean energy to a crowd in Boulder, CO, in April 2011 at the invitation of the local organization Clean Energy Action.  The city of Boulder is currently considering municipalization of its utility. Continue reading

Article filed under Energy, Energy Self-Reliant States | Written by John Farrell | No Comments | Updated on Jul 18, 2011

WI Public Service Commission schedules Two Wisconsin EIS Scoping Meetings (CapX2020)

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://www.ilsr.org/wi-public-service-commission-schedules-two-wisconsin-eis-scoping-meetings-capx2020/

WI Public Service Commission schedules Two Wisconsin EIS Scoping Meetings (CapX2020)

July 14 in Cochrane, WI

Continue reading