Back to top Jump to featured resources

Viewing all Articles Page 158 of 296

Article filed under Energy, Energy Self-Reliant States | Written by John Farrell | No Comments | Updated on Jul 18, 2011

State agency takes on Xcel over proposed rate increase

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://www.ilsr.org/state-agency-takes-xcel-over-proposed-rate-increase/

 

Original date: April 6, 2011

The Minnesota Department of Commerce on Wednesday objected to Xcel Energy Inc.’s proposed rate increases, saying the utility needs far less to operate. The department’s Office of Energy Security recommended knocking down by $107 million, or more than half, the planned increase of $198 million.

Continue reading

capx-photo1.png
Article filed under Energy, Energy Self-Reliant States | Written by John Farrell | No Comments | Updated on Jul 18, 2011

Massive power line to run through Oronoco Township

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://www.ilsr.org/massive-power-line-run-through-oronoco-township/

 A 17-story power line in their backyard.  That’s what some Oronoco Township residents face should CapX2020′s high-voltage transmission project — one of the most ambitious expansions of Minnesota’s transmission grid ever — run through their land.

Continue reading

Article filed under Energy, Energy Self-Reliant States | Written by John Farrell | No Comments | Updated on Jul 18, 2011

Public Service Commission says CapX2020 application incomplete

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://www.ilsr.org/public-service-commission-says-capx2020-application-incomplete-2/

The Wisconsin Public Service Commission(PSC) says an application for high-voltage power lines that would cross the Mississippi River at Alma is incomplete.  In a letter February 1 to 11 utility companies that make up the CapX2020 partnership, the PSC says the application for a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity is incomplete due to "missing, or inaccurate information." Continue reading

Article filed under Energy, Energy Self-Reliant States | Written by John Farrell | No Comments | Updated on Jul 14, 2011

Badger Coulee (Amer. Transmission Co.) power line project hits speed bump

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://www.ilsr.org/badger-coulee-amer-transmission-co-power-line-project-hits-speed-bump/

State regulators want more information before they will further consider CapX2020’s application to route a
high-voltage line through three western Wisconsin counties.

The Public Service Commission of Wisconsin recently sent the energy company consortium a three-page list
containing almost 100 data requests on the proposed project, which would extend in the state from Alma to a
substation to be built in the town of Onalaska.

The requests range from updated cost estimates for the plan and any alternative routes to potential effects on Continue reading

Article filed under Energy, Energy Self-Reliant States | Written by John Farrell | No Comments | Updated on Jul 14, 2011

Regulatory Roadblocks to Democratizing the Electricity System

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://www.ilsr.org/regulatory-roadblocks-democratizing-electricity-system/

A serialized version of our new report, Democratizing the Electricity System, Part 4 of 5. Click here for: Part 1 (The Electric System: Inflection Point) Part 2 (The Economics of Distributed Generation) Part 3 (The Political and Technical Advantages of Distributed Generation) Download the report. Regulatory Roadblocks / The Political System Despite technology’s march toward… Continue reading

sustainable products
Article filed under Biomaterials, Composting, Waste to Wealth | Written by admin | No Comments | Updated on Jul 13, 2011

Why Consider Compostable Food Service Products?

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://www.ilsr.org/why-consider-compostable-food-service-products/

ILSR’s new fact sheet on “FAQs: Why Choose Compostable Products for Food Service” explains what constitutes compostable products, where they are available, and the importance of working with local composters to ensure they are composted. Continue reading

Article filed under Energy, Energy Self-Reliant States | Written by John Farrell | No Comments | Updated on Jul 13, 2011

The Power of Comprehensive Energy Policy

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://www.ilsr.org/power-comprehensive-energy-policy/

If Germany’s 16 federal states had each enacted their own renewable energy legislation, we’d have far less solar energy usage. I often tell people that Germany has 400 types of beer and one renewables law, while the situation in the United States is the other way around.

Continue reading

Article filed under Energy, Energy Self-Reliant States | Written by John Farrell | No Comments | Updated on Jul 13, 2011

Could California Save 30% or More on Solar With German Policy?

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://www.ilsr.org/could-california-save-30-or-more-solar-german-policy-2/

The Golden State has covered over 50,000 roofs with solar PV in the past decade, but could it also save 30% or more on its current solar costs?  Renewable energy guru Paul Gipe wrote up a study last week that found that Californians pay much more per kilowatt-hour of solar power than Germans do (accounting for the difference in the solar resource). The following chart outlines the various ways Californians pay for solar, compared to the Germans (averaged over 20 years, per kilowatt-hour produced).

While the study doesn’t explore the rationale, here are a few possibilities:

  1. The inefficiency of federal tax credits artificially inflates the cost of U.S. solar.
  2. Big banks that offer financing for residential solar leasing routinely overstate the value of the systems, increasing taxpayer costs on otherwise cost-effective systems.
  3. The complexity and intricacy of the state and federal incentives (4 separate pots of money!) and the lack of guaranteed interconnection means higher risk and higher cost for U.S. solar projects.
  4. The inconsistency in local permitting standards that increases project overhead costs.

Ultimately, the combination of these market-dampening problems in the California market has hindered the cost savings that have hit the German market.  California solar installations of 25 kilowatts (kW) and 100 kW have a quoted price of $4.36 and $3.84 per Watt, respectively, according to the Clean Coalition.  This compares to $3.40 per Watt on average for already installed projects of 10-100 kW in Germany.   

Given a solar cost disadvantage that is present both in the value of incentives AND in the actual installed cost, renewable energy advocates in California should seriously question whether the current policy framework makes sense. The mish-mash of federal tax credits and state/utility rebates has not led to the same economies of scale and market maturity as Germany has accomplished with their CLEAN contract (a.k.a. feed-in tariff).  

Switching energy policies could save ratepayers billions. 

A 24-cent CLEAN contract price for California solar (to match the German contract) would replace the entire slate of existing solar incentives with an overall average cost 30% lower than the current combined incentives.  If 2011 is a banner year and the state sees 1 gigawatt (GW) of installed capacity, the savings to ratepayers of a CLEAN program (over 20 years) would be nearly $3 billion.

If the CLEAN price were adjusted down to assume that projects could use the federal tax credit, then California could set the contract price as low as 18.5 cents per kWh, 5 cents less than is currently paid by California ratepayers (although requiring projects to use tax credits has significant liabilities). 

Several states and municipal utilities (Vermont; Gainesville, FL; San Antonio, TX) have already shifted to this simple, comprehensive policy, with promising early results.  Californians should consider whether holding to an outdated and complicated energy policy is worth paying billions of dollars extra for solar power.

Continue reading

Radio Microphone with On Air
Article, ILSR Press Room, Resource filed under Energy, Energy Self-Reliant States | Written by admin | No Comments | Updated on Jul 13, 2011

John Farrell talks about Democratizing the Electricity System on the Progressive Radio Network

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://www.ilsr.org/john-farrell-talks-about-democratizing-electricity-system-progressive-radio-network/

SolarTimes editor Sandy LeonVest in conversation with energy researcher John Farrell, of the Institute for Local Self Reliance. They discuss “energy democracy” and John Farrell’s recently published report, “Democratizing the Electricity System.” Continue reading