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Viewing all Resources from Waste to Wealth Page 7 of 11

Article, Resource filed under Waste to Wealth | Written by admin | No Comments | Updated on Jan 25, 2002

ILSR’s Facts to Act On Series on Extended Producer Responsibility

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://www.ilsr.org/ilsrs-facts-to-act-on-series-on-extended-producer-responsibility/

Between 1990 and 1993, ILSR published its Facts to Act On series, 38 articles covering a wide range of topics on recycling, waste management, and grassroots organizing. The series was renewed between 2000 and 2002. Continue reading

Resource filed under Composting, Waste to Wealth | Written by admin | No Comments | Updated on Jan 14, 2002

Record Setting Recycling and Composting Programs

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://www.ilsr.org/record-setting-recycling-and-composting-programs/

Twenty years ago, many solid waste planners thought no more than 15% to 20% of the municipal waste stream could be recycled. ILSR’s 1988 publication, Beyond 25%: Materials Recovery Age Comes of Age, shattered this myth. It featured 15 communities recycling 25% or more of their residential and commercial/institutional discards. Our 1991 report Beyond 40%:… Continue reading

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Article, Resource filed under Deconstruction, Waste to Wealth | Written by admin | No Comments | Updated on Jan 3, 2002

ILSR’s Waste to Wealth E-Bits — Vol. 2, No. 2

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://www.ilsr.org/ilsrs-waste-to-wealth-e-bits-vol-2-no-2/

E-Bits highlights ILSR’s Waste to Wealth Program work, from creating jobs and recycling-oriented enterprises, to recycling policies that close the loop locally, to model waste reduction initiatives. Continue reading

Resource filed under Waste to Wealth | Written by admin | No Comments | Updated on Jan 1, 2002

Innovation, Leadership, Stewardship

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://www.ilsr.org/innovation-leadership-stewardship/

Alameda County, California (pop. 1.46 million), diverts almost 60% of its municipal solid waste, making it one of the nation’s record-setting recycling communities. The Alameda County Waste Management Authority and Recycling Board deserves much credit. This glossy booklet — chock full of case studies and photographs — features the Board’s source reduction, reuse, construction material… Continue reading

Resource filed under Waste to Wealth | Written by admin | No Comments | Updated on Jan 1, 2002

Asian Countries Jump on the EPR Bandwagaon

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://www.ilsr.org/asian-countries-jump-on-the-epr-bandwagaon/

This Facts to Act On features policies introduced in Japan, Korea, and Taiwan to make manufacturers take more responsibility for the products and packaging they produce. Korea, for instance, has instituted deposit-refund systems, non-refundable product fees, and design requirements for packaging. The country also has restrictions on the distribution of disposable goods. by Kelly Lease… Continue reading

filed under Waste to Wealth | Written by admin | No Comments | Updated on Dec 1, 2001

Hartford, CT

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://www.ilsr.org/hartford-ct/

2000-2001 In 1998, ILSR met with the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to explain how programs like HUD’s Hope VI (which provides hundreds of millions of dollars annually to demolish buildings) could use deconstruction to renovate public housing in an environmentally-sound manner, while helping HUD meet its Section 3 (community investment) obligations. At… Continue reading

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Article, Resource filed under Deconstruction, Stop Incineration, Waste to Wealth | Written by admin | No Comments | Updated on Jul 1, 2001

ILSR’s Waste to Wealth E-Bits — Vol. 2, No. 1

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://www.ilsr.org/ilsrs-waste-to-wealth-e-bits-vol-2-no-1/

E-Bits highlights ILSR’s Waste to Wealth Program work, from creating jobs and recycling-oriented enterprises, to recycling policies that close the loop locally, to model waste reduction initiatives. Continue reading

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Resource filed under Deconstruction, Waste to Wealth | Written by Neil Seldman | No Comments | Updated on Apr 1, 2001

Building a Deconstruction Company: A Training Manual for Facilitators and Entrepreneurs

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://www.ilsr.org/building-a-deconstruction-company-a-training-manual-for-facilitators-and-entrepreneurs-2/

ILSR’s manual provides an excellent resource for anyone interested in starting a deconstruction company. No matter whether you are an entrepreneur, community-based organization, construction-related company, or governmental organization, this manual will introduce to you to many of the steps needed to form a deconstruction company. The manual takes the reader from setup and funding, to… Continue reading

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Resource filed under Deconstruction, Waste to Wealth, Zero Waste & Economic Development | Written by admin | No Comments | Updated on Dec 9, 2000

Building Savings: Strategies for Waste Reduction of Debris from Buildings

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://www.ilsr.org/building-savings-strategies-for-waste-reduction-of-debris-from-buildings-2/

This fact sheet packet profiles seven building projects—from new construction to renovation and deconstruction—that are recovering 42 to 82% of materials otherwise destined for disposal. Policymakers wanting to encourage building material recovery, building owners and developers interested in green building design, and contractors seeking a competitive edge will find this document useful. Continue reading

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Article, Resource filed under Deconstruction, Stop Incineration, Waste to Wealth | Written by admin | No Comments | Updated on Dec 1, 2000

ILSR’s Waste to Wealth E-Bits – Vol. 1, No. 2

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://www.ilsr.org/ilsrs-waste-to-wealth-e-bits-vol-1-no-2/

E-Bits highlights ILSR’s Waste to Wealth Program work, from creating jobs and recycling-oriented enterprises, to recycling policies that close the loop locally, to model waste reduction initiatives. Continue reading

Resource filed under Waste to Wealth | Written by admin | No Comments | Updated on Nov 1, 2000

Local Initiatives Leverage Extended Producer Responsibility

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://www.ilsr.org/local-initiatives-leverage-extended-producer-responsibility/

This Facts to Act On describes local initiatives to spur extended producer responsibility such as networking with industry in a voluntary approach, passing local resolutions, banning products that harm the environment, and developing purchasing protocols that encourage environmentally sound products. Efforts in Los Angeles, the Pacific Northwest, Minnesota, and elsewhere are covered. Includes links to… Continue reading

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Article, Resource filed under Deconstruction, Waste to Wealth, Zero Waste & Economic Development | Written by admin | No Comments | Updated on Jun 14, 2000

ILSR’s Waste to Wealth E-Bits — Vol. 1, No. 1

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://www.ilsr.org/ilsrs-waste-to-wealth-e-bits-vol-1-no-1/

E-Bits highlights ILSR’s Waste to Wealth Program work, from creating jobs and recycling-oriented enterprises, to recycling policies that close the loop locally, to model waste reduction initiatives. Continue reading

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Resource filed under Deconstruction, Waste to Wealth, Zero Waste & Economic Development | Written by admin | No Comments | Updated on Jun 1, 2000

Building Savings: Strategies for Waste Reduction of Debris from Buildings

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://www.ilsr.org/building-material-recovery/

This fact sheet packet profiles seven building projects-from new construction to renovation and deconstruction-that are recovering 42 to 82% of materials otherwise destined for disposal. Policymakers wanting to encourage building material recovery, building owners and developers interested in green building design, and contractors seeking a competitive edge will find this document useful. Continue reading

filed under Waste to Wealth, Zero Waste & Economic Development | Written by admin | No Comments | Updated on Feb 14, 2000

Serving Diverse Populations with Recycling

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://www.ilsr.org/serving-diverse-populations-with-recycling/

Serving Diverse Populations with Recycling by Mark Jackson 2000This case study, prepared for the California Integrated Waste Management Board, identifies barriers communities may face in delivering recycling services to diverse populations (multi-ethnic, low-income, tourist, student, elderly), and features how cities are overcoming these challenges. Continue reading

filed under Waste to Wealth, Zero Waste & Economic Development | Written by admin | No Comments | Updated on Feb 14, 2000

Special Events

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://www.ilsr.org/special-events/

Recycling at Special Events by Kelly Lease 2000This case study, prepared for the California Integrated Waste Management Board, will help event organizers to reduce waste and local planners to establish programs and policies to encourage event recycling within their jurisdictions. It highlights efforts in California and elsewhere. Continue reading