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Article filed under Energy, Energy Self-Reliant States | Written by Wade | 1 Comment | Updated on Jun 26, 2013

Positive Policy Changes for Distributed Renewable Energy

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://www.ilsr.org/positive-policy/

From outdated technical rules to local permitting to incentive policies, there are opportunities to increase the potential for local solar. This is the fourth of five parts of our Rooftop Revolution report being published in serial.  Read Part 1 or Part 2 or Part 3. Download the entire report and see our other resources here…. Continue reading

Screenshot of Whiteboard video of Rooftop Revolution research
Article, ILSR Press Room, Resource filed under Energy, Energy Self-Reliant States | Written by admin | 2 Comments | Updated on Jan 24, 2013

Solar Rooftop Revolution: A Video Whiteboard

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://www.ilsr.org/solar-rooftop-revolution-video-whiteboard/

Solar company Renvu created a delightful whiteboard animation of the results from our Rooftop Revolution research, which automatically makes them cooler than the average solar company.  Check it out below or on Youtube. Continue reading

commercial solar grid parity report ILSR 2012 cover page
Featured Article, Resource filed under Energy, Energy Self-Reliant States | Written by John Farrell | 15 Comments | Updated on Dec 4, 2012

Commercial Rooftop Revolution

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://www.ilsr.org/commercial-roofop-revolution/

Although only 0.1% of electricity is generated by solar power in 2012; within a decade, 300,000 MW of unsubsidized solar power will be at parity with retail electricity prices in most of the United States and more than 35 million buildings may be generating their own solar electricity sufficient to power almost 10% of the country. Continue reading